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Cavities Sampler

Cavities Sampler is Erin Griffin’s adorable collection of short diary comics. Her round, cheery cartoons occasionally recall Lynda Barry or the more sadsack stories of Charlie Brown, but they are undeniably Griffin’s own. This book is lovingly handcrafted, bound with purple wire, and hand-numbered as part of a limited run of fifty-six.

(16 interior pages, 5.5″ x 8.5″, black & white with color cover, self-published)

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In Situ #2

Montreal-based cartoonist Sophie Yanow is a master of the sketchy, powerful diary comic. In Situ gives the readers faded snapshots, half-glimpsed moments of Yanow’s life couch-surfing in Canada and California, spending time with friends and lovers, trying to figure out what she’s doing with her life, and waxing political about education and the tuition crisis. Vague but strikingly elegant, this beautifully-designed and put-together comic is worth multiple reads.

(28 interior pages, 5.5″ x 8.5″, black & white with colored paper half-cover, Colosse)

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You Don’t Get There From Here #26

Hooray — the long-awaited issue #26 of You Don’t Get There From Here has arrived! This issue spans October 30th to December 12th, 2012. Carrie returns to Oaxaca to celebrate Dia de los Muertos, sightsee, and visit old friends. When she returns to California, the days are shorter, the roads have changed, and she has to deal with her father’s continuing descent into Alzheimer’s. Grab the next issue to find out how Carrie deals with the impending Mayan apocalypse, the end-of-year holidays, and the start of 2013!

(28 interior pages, 4.25″ x 5.5″, black and white, self-published)

I Want Everything To Be Okay
You Don’t Get There From Here #1
You Don’t Get There From Here #2
You Don’t Get There From Here #3
You Don’t Get There From Here #4
You Don’t Get There From Here #5
You Don’t Get There From Here #6
You Don’t Get There From Here #7
You Don’t Get There From Here #8
You Don’t Get There From Here #9
You Don’t Get There From Here Goes to Oaxaca
You Don’t Get There From Here #10
You Don’t Get There From Here #11
You Don’t Get There From Here #12
You Don’t Get There From Here #13
You Don’t Get There From Here #14
You Don’t Get There From Here #15
You Don’t Get There From Here #16
You Don’t Get There From Here #17
You Don’t Get There From Here #18
You Don’t Get There From Here #19
You Don’t Get There From Here #20
You Don’t Get There From Here #21
You Don’t Get There From Here #22
You Don’t Get There From Here #23
You Don’t Get There From Here #24
You Don’t Get There From Here #25

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Vortex #4

Welcome to the psychedelic space fantasy cosmos of the Hyperverse, a realm filled with immensely powerful beings who battle over worlds with strange geologies and hoard advanced technologies left by ancient starfarers. In this amazing conclusion to Vortex, the Miizzzard enters into a deadly battle in order to destroy the Empire’s Vortex-controlling device…but does he succeed? Get this issue to finish Cardini’s incredible series and find out!

William’s Website

(40 interior pages, 7″ x 10″, black and white, The Gold County Paper Mill)

I’ve enjoyed Cardini’s development as an artist and the refinement of his heavily Mat Brinkman-influenced style. Cardini works big in this sci-fi/fantasy battle comic, but more interestingly, he uses a deliberately artificial-looking style of line. You can see the dots and pixels on the page, giving the whole thing a cold and digital quality that is trying to separate the reader from Brinkman’s warm, organic and oozing imagery. That slight distance and primitiveness of the line quality (as opposed to the drawings themselves) adds a certain extra comical layer to a story that involves a wizard quite graphically and viscerally biting off the arm of a monster. The whole thing has a light-hearted feel, much like the rest of Cardini’s work, odd as it may appear on the surface. Working bigger certainly suits him, and I enjoyed looking at the images as images.” Rob Clough, High-Low

Vortex #1
Vortex #2
Vortex #3

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Reich #10

Reich is a thrilling biographical account of psychoanalyst and sex researcher Dr. Wilhelm Reich, a protégé of Freud. He courted scandal throughout Europe where he became known mostly for his controversial and radical ideas. Reich claimed to discover a palpable sexual energy, which he called “Orgone.” Reich was forced to move to America in 1939. In America, Reich founded Orgonon, a commune/laboratory located in Rangely, Maine. There he continued his research into Orgone energy. Reich claimed the energy was a panacea and was determined to prove it to the world.

Reich was abruptly persecuted by the United States government.

Reich tells the story of a man who lived with unwavering conviction in his beliefs and shows the potential danger of that conviction.

In issue #10, Reich’s paranoia begins to seriously damage both his personal and professional relationships, leading to the resignation of two of his closest associates. Reich carries on, creating a machine that draws Orgone radiation out of the atmosphere — and then finding a way to use it as a weapon. By the end of the issue, Reich’s former lawyer has filed an injunction against him, and someone close to Reich is dead. Things are beginning to crumble. Reich’s future grows less and less certain.

Elijah’s Website

Here’s hoping you’re all reading along and giving this guy as much money as possible; he’s one of the many artists out there who should have complete freedom to do whatever the hell he feels like.” Optical Sloth

Cartoonist and illustrator Elijah Brubaker has really started to get critics’ attention with his current comic book project Reich, from Sparkplug Comics: a fictionalized account of the notorious life of psychoanalyst Wilhelm Reich, who was persecuted throughout his professional life for his theories on human sexuality. Through a long-time fascination and exhaustive research, Brubaker has crafted an absorbing portrait of a tortured and ambitious man, and he hasn’t even gotten to the part about aliens yet!” David Paggi, Wizard Universe

(24 interior pgs, 6″ x 9″, color cover with black and white interiors, Sparkplug Books)

Reich #1
Reich #2
Reich #3
Reich #4
Reich #5
Reich #6
Reich #7
Reich #8
Reich #9

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Eye of the Majestic Creature #5

In this extra-long issue of Eye of the Majestic Creature, Stein juxtaposes Theodore Dreiser’s 1900 novel, Sister Carrie, with Larry’s own story to create a surprisingly moving and relevant installment. Stein’s cartooning, incredibly detailed stippling, and dry sense of humor together create a wonderfully unique and immersive story.

Leslie’s Website

(44 interior pages, 6.5″ x 10″, black and white newsprint with color cover, self-published)

Eye of the Majestic Creature #1
Eye of the Majestic Creature #2
Eye of the Majestic Creature #3
Yeah, It Is!

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Eye of the Majestic Creature #3

In issue #3, Larry goes home to Chicago to visit her family. She spends time with her bubbly mom, catches up with old friends, and endures an awkward dinner with her dad. Meanwhile, Marshmallow is at home keeping himself busy. Stein’s cartooning, incredibly detailed stippling, and dry sense of humor together create a wonderfully unique and immersive story.

Leslie’s Website

(36 interior pages, 6.5″ x 10″, black and white newsprint with accented color cover, self-published)

Eye of the Majestic Creature #1
Eye of the Majestic Creature #2
Eye of the Majestic Creature #5
Yeah, It Is!

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Eye of the Majestic Creature #2

Larry is realizing something about living in the middle of nowhere: it’s helped her anxiety, but she’s getting bored…and lonely. In this issue, she tries out a new entrepreneurial venture in the hopes of finding a sense of community. Stein’s cartooning, incredibly detailed stippling, and dry sense of humor together create a wonderfully unique and immersive story.

Leslie’s Website

(28 interior pages, 6.5″ x 10″, black and white newsprint, self-published)

Eye of the Majestic Creature #1
Eye of the Majestic Creature #3
Eye of the Majestic Creature #5
Yeah, It Is!

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Eye of the Majestic Creature #1

This is a loose, funny, and charming quasi-autobiographical comic that skillfully combines quirky fantasy and hard reality. Larry, our heroine, lives in the country with her talking guitar, Marshmallow, in a state of relative peacefulness…but what will happen when her friend Seashell comes to visit? Stein’s cartooning, incredibly detailed stippling, and dry sense of humor together create a wonderfully unique and immersive story.

Leslie’s Website

(12 interior pages, 6.5″ x 10″, newsprint B&W interior with color cover, self-published)

Yeah, It Is!
Eye of the Majestic Creature #2
Eye of the Majestic Creature #3
Eye of the Majestic Creature #5

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Vortex #3

Welcome to the psychedelic space fantasy cosmos of the Hyperverse, a realm filled with immensely powerful beings who battle over worlds with strange geologies and hoard advanced technologies left by ancient starfarers. In this issue, the Miizzzard is lost in the Vortex dreamworld, his fate unknown. What will become of him? Read on to find out!

William’s Website

(36 interior pages, 7″ x 10″, black and white, The Gold County Paper Mill)

I’ve enjoyed Cardini’s development as an artist and the refinement of his heavily Mat Brinkman-influenced style. Cardini works big in this sci-fi/fantasy battle comic, but more interestingly, he uses a deliberately artificial-looking style of line. You can see the dots and pixels on the page, giving the whole thing a cold and digital quality that is trying to separate the reader from Brinkman’s warm, organic and oozing imagery. That slight distance and primitiveness of the line quality (as opposed to the drawings themselves) adds a certain extra comical layer to a story that involves a wizard quite graphically and viscerally biting off the arm of a monster. The whole thing has a light-hearted feel, much like the rest of Cardini’s work, odd as it may appear on the surface. Working bigger certainly suits him, and I enjoyed looking at the images as images.” Rob Clough, High-Low

Vortex #1
Vortex #2
Vortex #4